Staghorn Sumac also can form large colonies from aggressive root suckers, something too many homeowners have discovered after buying one of the horticultural varieties offered in the garden trade. Staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina) earned its name because of the red-brown hairs that coat the branches, much like the red-brown velvet that covers a male deer's horns. USDA NRCS ND State Soil Conservation Committee; NDSU Extension and Western Area Power Administration, Bismarck. This shrub is found throughout the eastern half of the U.S., Canada, as well as in parts of Europe and Asia. Smooth sumac (Rhus glabra) and staghorn sumac (R. typhina) are the most common and readily available landscape species. One of the easiest deciduous shrubs to identify throughout the year, especially mid to late summer, staghorn sumac is in the anacardiaceae (cashew) family. Date modified: 2015-08-04 . Staghorn sumac gets its name from its thick, velvety upper branches, which resemble the antlers of young male deer. Staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina) is a small tree with branches that spread to make a small rounded crown. Unlike poison sumac, the leaves have ridged edges. Staghorn Sumac Anacardiaceae. Compact clusters of greenish-yellow flowers bloom from June to July. Both plants can grow together and may be difficult to tell apart. Other common regional names include red sumac, scarlet sumac, common sumac, and western sumac. staghorn sumac Anacardiaceae Rhus typhina L. symbol: RHTY Leaf: Alternate, pinnately compound, 16 to 24 inches long, with 11 to 31 lanceolate leaflets with serrate margins each 2 to 5 inches long, rachis fuzzy; green above and paler below. staghorn sumac Taxonomic Tree; Domain: Eukaryota Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Spermatophyta ... Pang ZR; Chen Y, 2004. Close up of flowers. The most widespread sumac — staghorn sumac — is non-poisonous. Photo by David Taylor. Rhus typhina is the largest of the North American sumacs, an open, spreading shrub (sometimes a small tree), earning the common name staghorn sumac because of the reddish-brown hairs covering the branches as velvet covers the antlers of deer. Sumac is a shrub of the genus Rhus of the family Anacardiaceae. EdibleWildFood.com is informational in nature. Hardiness zones are based largely on climate, particularly minimum temperatures. A Staghorn sumac or velvet sumac ,Rhus typhina bush showing the red fruits, alternate, pinnately compound leaves, and velvet covering of new branches Autumn colored Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina), Divonne les bains, France. In our "Plants to Know" series, we are looking at a variety of common plants, medicinal plants, edible plants, and even invasive plants. The point I am trying to make here is that staghorn sumac is not poisonous! Staghorn sumac is an open land species often found on drier soils, but which may occasionally occur on low ground. Few trees can grow in such degraded soil like this tree can. Foliage – deciduous Flowering – June to August. Leaflet veins and leaf petioles are densely hairy. The fruits are sometimes soaked in water to make a tart, somewhat lemony drink. It is a species of prairies and other grasslands, old fields, roadsides, savannas and woodlands, and fencerows. They are members of the cashew family. Most strikingly, they share a trait that draws much attention to them in autumn: extremely colorful fall foliage. While we strive to be 100% accurate, it is solely up to the reader to ensure proper plant identification. Staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina), also known as velvet sumac, is a deciduous tree or shrub with distinctive red seed cones. List of key staghorn tree facts. USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E., et al. Li ZX; Sun XG; Li QH; Guo HL, 2007. It is strongly rhizomatous. Caterpillars of many moths and butterflies eat the foliage. Leaflets are lance-shaped to narrowly oblong with a pointed tip, 2 to 5 inches long with coarsely toothed margins. One of the best examples of such look-alikes is Ailanthus altissima (Tree-of-Heaven) and two native sumacs to the region, Rhus typhina (staghorn sumac) and Rhus glabra (smooth sumac). Expand. As you can see, like Tree-of-Heaven, the leaves are also pinnately compound with a central stem, or rachis. This is an open, spreading shrub (sometimes a … The sac-like galls found on Staghorn and Smooth Sumac are anywhere from marble- to ping pong ball-size, and usually become obvious in late summer when they often acquire a rosy pink blush. Many of them believe sumac plants (Rhus spp.) Staghorn sumac is the largest of the North American sumacs. Cluster of fruits. Foliage – deciduous Flowering – June to August. Only shrubs that are 3 to 4 years old can produce the fruit. Tree Size: 30-40 ft (10-12 m) tall, 6-12 in (15-30 cm) trunk diameter. Toxicodendron (the Poison ivy, Poison oak, Poison sumac family.) The bush is a member of the Anacardiaceae or Cashew family, and is a native to eastern North America. Tiny green flowers in the spring are insignificant, but are later replaced by large cones of crimson berries that remain throughout the winter. Staghorn sumac (also spelled sumach) is the most common of three species that grow in Ontario. long (60 cm), turns striking shades of orange, yellow and scarlet in fall. It is very similar to the more desireable staghorn sumac, but it has smooth rather than velvety bark. Tree of Heaven vs Staghorn Sumac. Female Sumac Gall Aphids Leaving Galls & Heading For Moss. Staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina) is a small tree with branches that spread to make a small rounded crown. Sumac (pronounced (/ ˈ sj uː m æ k /) or (/ ˈ s uː m æ k /), and also spelled sumach, sumak, soumak, and sumaq) is any one of about 35 species of flowering plants in the genus Rhus and related genera, in the family Anacardiaceae.It grows in subtropical and temperate regions throughout the world, especially in East Asia, Africa, and North America. 6 to 16 inches) long by 10 to 18 centimeters (ca. Typical habitats include open fields, roadsides, fence rows, and parkland. Some bird and small mammal species eat the fruits. Commonly found on field edges, roadsides and forest borders. Both grow 10 to 15 feet (3-5 m.) tall with a similar width, and have bright red fall colors. Bioassay of the resistance of Rhus typhina L. against spider mites. Numerous lacey leaf cultivars exist. Rhus typhina, the technical name for staghorn sumac, is a species of flowering plant in the family Anacardiaceae, native to eastern North America. Leaves. Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina) Description: One of the easiest shrubs to identify throughout the year, staghorn sumac has a spreading, open form growing up to 15 feet (4.6 m) tall. Photos. Each drupe measures about 5mm (1/4”) in diameter and contains one seed. But there are couple of safety issues to consider. However, the flowers can really help if you want to keep (Sumac… Average Dried Weight: 33 lbs/ft 3 (530 kg/m 3) Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC):.45, .53. Feedback on this page. Staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina). Common Name(s): Sumac, Staghorn Sumac. It generally prefers fertile, upland sites but tolerates a wide variety of conditions. Colony-forming shrub to small tree. It also occurs in South Dakota, Kansas and Utah. US Forest Service, FM-RM-VE • It was used by Native Americans to blend with tobacco. This is not the case as I have found pieces laying on the ground exposed to the elements for 10 years, and only the sapwood has rotted. Staghorn Sumac is a member of the Anacardiaceae, the Sumac or Cashew family. Beginners at plant identification can easily confuse poison sumac and non-rash-causing types of sumac such as staghorn sumac.Indeed, the plants are related. Sumac species are avoided by some gardeners for a couple of reasons. Staghorn sumac – Rhus typhina. Photo by David Taylor. Trees, insects and diseases of Canada's forests Trees. Identification, health, STAGHORN SUMAC Rhus hirta (L.) Sudworth Plant Symbol = RHHI2 Contributed by: USDA NRCS Northeast Plant Materials Program Britton & Brown 1913 Courtesy of Kentucky Native Plant Society @ PLANTS Alternate Names Rhus typhina L. Uses Sumac serves primarily as a winter emergency food for wildlife. In this video, you will learn the difference between Staghorn Sumac and Smooth Sumac. Branches display U-shaped leaf scars in winter. AND. In fact, it is most often encountered in roadside ditches and at the edges of farm fields. Multiple branched shrub with large compound leaves turning a rainbow of colors early in the fall. Staghorn sumac trees range from 15 to 25 feet in height and 20 to 30 feet in width. However, the big difference is that the poison sumac has clusters of grayish white berries that hang down, and it tends to grow exclusively in low, wet, or flooded areas such as swamps. Name – Rhus typhina Family – Anacardiaceae Type – shrub. The leaflets are dark green and smooth above, and pale beneath, except along the midrib. Canadian Species . It is a species of prairies and other grasslands, old fields, roadsides, savannas and woodlands, and fencerows. However, the flowers can really help if you want to keep (Sumac… Staghorn sumac grows in an open form that can grow up to 7 metres (25') tall and can be as equally wide. (Rhus typhina) Distribution: Northeastern United States. Staghorn Sumac Tree Facts. Both plants can grow together and may be difficult to tell apart. These trees are sometimes confused because of similar compound leaf shape and occurrence in the same disturbed habitats. In: Soil and Water Conservation in China. Staghorn Sumac is a wide-spreading large shrub developing a flat-topped appearance. Staghorn Sumac, which is not toxic to humans and is the best species for sumac lemonade, grows as a bush/tree like structure. Anacardiaceae Family: Staghorn sumac is a U.S. native, deciduous, large shrub to small tree that can attain a height of 30-35 feet. We are not health professionals, medical doctors, nor are we nutritionists. Name – Rhus typhina Family – Anacardiaceae Type – shrub. Rhus typhina, the staghorn sumac, is a species of flowering plant in the family Anacardiaceae, native to eastern North America. Staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina) earned its name because of the red-brown hairs that coat the branches, much like the red-brown velvet that covers a male deer's horns. Scientific Name: Rhus spp. The leafy stems are furry. They make excellent wildlife shrubs because they provide shelter and food for birds and small mammals. List of key staghorn tree facts. Rhus glabra (smooth sumac) can be distinguished from staghorn sumac by the lack of hairs on its stems and petioles. Plant staghorn sumac trees in the margins of swamps, streams or woodlands. Each flower is about 5mm (1/4") across, consisting of 5 spreading petals, a calyx with 5 lobes, 5 stamens, and a central pistil. It is native to woodland edges, roadsides, railroad embankments and stream/swamp margins from Quebec to Ontario to Minnesota south to Georgia, Indiana and Iowa. Another common wildlife food genus, related to sumac. Can Non-Poison Sumac Trees Cause a Rash?. Poison sumac is not edible, and like any foraged plant or ‘shroom, you should be 110% sure of what you’ve found before eating it. Twigs are stout, densely red hairy and 16 to 20 millimeters (5/8 to 3/4 inches) thick (see photo). Habitat. Photo by David Taylor. Its open habit and hairy stems resemble horns on a male deer, giving staghorn sumac its name. Wild food can help treat various medical conditions. 4 to 7 inches) wide. Rhus typhina L. Anacardiaceae (Cashew family) Life cycle. Younger branches tend to be brown and smooth. Colony-forming shrub to small tree. Poison sumac (Toxicodendron vernix) has leaves somewhat similar to staghorn sumac. The ones around me are approximately 10-20 feet tall. Family: Anacardiaceae: Genus: Rhus: Species: R. typhina: Common name: Staghorn sumac: ZBAS: 8: I just noticed that this flower is basically done recently. They can be easily distinguished at any time of year by leaves, twigs, bark, and fruit. All it needs is an abandoned field, highway median or roadside ditch and it’s happy as can be. Leaflets are lance-shaped to narrowly oblong with a pointed tip, 2 to 5 inches long with coarsely toothed margins. Fruits are fuzzy, bright red to brownish-red, 1-seeded drupes (like a cherry or peach) about 4 millimeters (1/6 inches) across. Staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina) grows just about anywhere and everywhere all across the eastern part of the United States. Acta Entomologica Sinica, 50(12):1309-1314. You can differentiate the species by the fact that the branches of staghorn sumac have a furry texture. Mailstop Code: 1103 Smooth sumac (Rhus glabra) and staghorn sumac (R. typhina) are the most common and readily available landscape species. Bees, wasps, and beetles are strongly attracted to the flowers. Staghorn sumac has alternate, compound leaves, 40 to 60 cm (16 to 24") long. I always find Staghorn Sumac as having very low rot resistance. Leaves are alternate and pinnately compound, 20 to 40 centimeters (ca. Without attention, it can become weedy. Moreover, they both are tall shrubs (sometimes reaching about 30 feet tall), deciduous, and native to eastern North America. Bark is typically smooth and dark brown. In Canada it occurs from Nova Scotia west to Ontario. Zachary Huang, Michigan State University. The large clustered seed pods attract a variety of wildlife into the winter months. Species Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina) Family : Anacardiaceae Zone: 3 - 8. It can grow in slightly acid soil but will not do as well as those in fertile areas. Rhus typhina, commonly called staghorn sumac, is the largest of the North American sumacs. Staghorn Sumac, a dangerous alien tree species. The heart, when split, shows no spalting, even after that time. Sharing a genus with poison sumac (Rhus vernix) has unnecessarily blackballed staghorn sumac (R. typhina) from inclusion in many landscape plans. It is found from New England south to Georgia west to Michigan, Iowa, Missouri and Mississippi. It is named for its branches which resemble the velvety antlers of a deer. It has large pinnate leaves with 13 to 27 toothed leaflets. Michigan Honey Plants: Staghorn sumac. The fruiting head is a compact cluster of round, red, hairy fruits called drupes. This sumac is 1 to 10 meters (ca. to keep it up with flowers if I were to write on … Alternate, pinnately compound with nine to 31 leaflets approaching 24 inches long. The two species that I’ve observed most commonly around the Ohio River Valley are R. typhina (staghorn sumac) and R. copallina (winged or shining sumac), but once you develop an eye for this genus they’re all very easy to spot.Many bear very close resemblance to the staghorn. Plant staghorn sumac trees in the margins of swamps, streams or woodlands. 8 inches) long and 5 to 10 centimeters (2 to 4 inches) across (see photo). It is native to woodland edges, roadsides, railroad embankments and stream/swamp margins from Quebec to Ontario to Minnesota south to Georgia, Indiana and Iowa. You can differentiate the species by the fact that the branches of staghorn sumac have a furry texture. Yellow to greenish, 5-petaled flowers are small, only about 3 millimeters (about 1/8 inches) wide (see photo). It is found from New England south to Georgia west to Michigan, Iowa, Missouri and Mississippi. Since staghorn sumac and black walnut are common and often found growing in similar areas as Tree-of-Heaven, we will focus on these two native look-alikes. The trunks are generally between 5 and 10 cm (2 to 4”) wide, but some have been recorded with diameters as great at 38 cm (15”). Staghorn Sumac is a native to Ohio and a great naturalizer plant. Staghorn Sumac is a native to Ohio and a great naturalizer plant. It is difficult in summer (swarm control bee checking today!) Habitat. Staghorn sumac is the largest of the North American sumacs. are invasive, but most species are not. Tree of Heaven, Ailanthus altissima and Staghorn Sumac, Rhus typhina, can be difficult to differentiate in the winter months. Tree of Heaven vs Staghorn Sumac. Staghorn sumac is often used in mass plantings, for naturalizing, or on steep slopes. Panicle of flowers. Staghorn sumac makes a lovely, vitamin-C-rich beverage sometimes called Indian lemonade. native to Canada down through the United States; zone 4 ; Habit and Form. Similar Images . This is an open, spreading shrub (sometimes a small tree) that typically grows 15-25’ tall. Staghorn sumac (rhus typhina) identification video : Plants To Know: Staghorn Sumac EverydayTacticalVids : About Published on Aug 14, 2014. North Dakota tree handbook. 1400 Independence Ave., SW Prized for its spectacular fall foliage and showy fruits, Rhus typhina (Staghorn Sumac) is a large suckering deciduous shrub or small tree with picturesque branches and velvety reddish-brown branchlets. Moreover, they both are tall shrubs (sometimes reaching about 30 feet tall), deciduous, and native to eastern North America. To support our efforts please browse our store (books with medicinal info, etc.). Although technically a shrub, it can grow to a tree size. Human connections : Historically, sumac species were used by Native Americans for a variety of medicinal purposes — to control vomiting and fever, treat scurvy, and as a poultice for skin ailments. Ring-necked pheasant, bobwhite quail, wild turkey, and about 300 species of songbirds include sumac … Here is the leaf of staghorn sumac. The largest trees are 10 meters (30+ feet). The stem may reach 25 centimeters (ca. It does become brittle with time, but that is the case to a lesser degree with redwood and cedar as well. #115784761 - Red berries with lots of hairs on a staghorn sumac tree, Rhus.. Species in this family range from medium-sized trees to herbs a few inches high. Short-tongued bees, flies, and wasps visit the flowers for pollen, while carpenter bees occasionally burrow into the stems. The ripe fruit can be used in baking but the tiny black seeds are very hard and can be problematic for the teeth if chewed on. I’ve shared how I make sumac lemonade in a previous post, and this recipe is a variation on the theme. Staghorn sumac, also called vinegar sumac, is a short tree that grows in a roundish shape. There’s nothing like a tasty plant that just loves to grow in just about anywhere, it’s a forager’s dream. Leaves. See more ideas about Specimen trees, Sumac, Plants. Staghorn sumac … Staghorn sumac is a small deciduous tree that grows in thickets or clusters. Typically found in large colonies; Range. This is it: To be clear: we are not talking about poison sumac here. One of the best examples of such look-alikes is Ailanthus altissima (Tree-of-Heaven) and two native sumacs to the region, Rhus typhina (staghorn sumac) and Rhus glabra (smooth sumac). 10 inches) diameter. 3 to 33 feet) tall, usually tree-like, but in thickets, and occasionally shrubby. The most popular sumacs for landscape use are winged, staghorn, and smooth sumac, either the native wild species or specially-bred cultivated varieties such as the golden leaf “Tiger Eye” sumac. Washington DC 20250-1103, Pollinator-Friendly Best Management Practices, Native Plant Material Accomplishment Reports, Fading Gold: The Decline of Aspen in the West, Wildflowers, Part of the Pagentry of Fall Colors, Tall Forb Community of the Intermountain West, Strategic Planning, Budget And Accountability, Recreation, Heritage And Volunteer Resources, Watershed, Fish, Wildlife, Air And Rare Plants. But, the easiest way to identify is to look for the staghorn’s unique flower/fruiting structure: See more ideas about Sumac, Plants, Shrubs. Click. Can grow to a height of 20 ft at maturity. Rhus typhina range map. On poison sumac plants, each stem has 2 parallel rows of leaves growing along its length. Add to Likebox #137277434 - Autumn landscape photography, mountain … It is also sometimes known as velvet sumac. The leaflets are narrowed or rounded at the base and sharply • The berries are high in vitamin C and are useful for colds, fever and scurvy. If you are certain that it IS poison sumac, and that removal is necessary, be sure to wear long pants, long sleeves, gloves, and boots, covering as much skin as possible. a large open shrub or weedy tree; flat-topped crown; colonizes and suckers; 15' to 25' tall; spread si difficult to determine because it colonizes; coarse texture; fast growth rate;
2020 staghorn sumac identification