Shock is a life-threatening condition that occurs when oxygen and nutrients can't reach the tissues in a cat's body. You may notice that your cat acting strangely after a fight. The last thing you want to do after your cat had a fight is offer them a new trauma by scolding them. It is important to recognize these signs and to be aware of some of the more common reasons a cat will go into shock. If a cat is in shock, do not take time to split fractures or treat minor injuries. 2 Answers. She is subdued and appears a bit stunned. There are 24 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. How do cats behave after fighting? I am guessing she will need to go to the vet to get any bites/scratches attended to. Dr. Baker received her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Wisconsin in 2016, and went on to pursue a PhD through her work in the Comparative Orthopaedic Research Laboratory. Dr. Baker received her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Wisconsin in 2016, and went on to pursue a PhD through her work in the Comparative Orthopaedic Research Laboratory. My cat had a fight yesterday with another cat, afterwards when he came in was acting really strangely and then I noticed he was limping and not putting any weight on his front paw. Instead, use the following cat care tips:. She had no blood, scratches or bites on her as far as I can see, she is not licking herself anywhere. Pale or white gums indicate the cat is almost certainly in shock and may have serious internal injuries and/or bleeding. i made an account just so i could ask this, ive been really worried about my cat the past 24 hours or so. If your cat is excited or scared, such as when they are in an unfamiliar situation or have just experienced trauma, they may have an abnormally high heart rate. I can't afford to take him to a vet. My cat recently got into a fight after he was out all night. If your cat becomes injured, there is a high probability that he will go into shock. Just have the cat looked at. Now he is limping and not really himself. The two cats exploded into a full fight, up on their back legs, screaming. To keep everyone safe in the meantime, confine your cat to an area of the house where you can keep all interactions with her to a minimum and have a responsible person supervise her. Please help us continue to provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikiHow on your ad blocker. Even the friendliest of cats can get into an altercation with another cat, dog or other domesticated or wild animal. If your cat seriously threatens you, another person, or another pet—and the behavior isn't an isolated incident—you should seek help as soon as possible from a cat behavior specialist. If your cat seriously threatens you, another person, or another pet—and the behavior isn't an isolated incident—you should seek help as soon as possible from a cat behavior specialist. Holiday Costume Ideas For Your Pups. The emotional signs exhibited by a cat that has been intentionally mishandled or abused can vary greatly from those found in a cat that has been hurt in a fight, or a cat that has hurt itself by accident. Lv 4. Shock is dangerous. Dealing with cat fights is a common experience for many cat owners. This article has been viewed 15,243 times. I noticed he had some feces by his backside and went to grab him so I could wash him off before it got on the carpet. This article was co-authored by Lauren Baker, DVM, PhD. By continuing to use this site you consent to the use of cookies on your device as described in our cookie policy unless you have disabled them. A normal heart rate for adult cats is 110-130 beats per minute. Reader Favorites. Shock In Cats. Additionally, check your cat’s heartbeat by placing your hand on its chest behind the left elbow. He's eating. You should take her to the vet to get her checked out. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. We turned on the light and saw a cat that looked amazingly identical to our boy tangling with a yellow tabby that runs around the neighborhood. In fact, we didn't even realize he had gotten out until we were awakened in the middle of the night by a cat fight on our back porch. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/e\/ef\/Recognize-Signs-of-Shock-in-a-Cat-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Recognize-Signs-of-Shock-in-a-Cat-Step-1-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/e\/ef\/Recognize-Signs-of-Shock-in-a-Cat-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\/aid8818817-v4-728px-Recognize-Signs-of-Shock-in-a-Cat-Step-1-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

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\n<\/p><\/div>"}, American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Leading organization dedicated to the prevention of animal cruelty, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/9\/9d\/Recognize-Signs-of-Shock-in-a-Cat-Step-19-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Recognize-Signs-of-Shock-in-a-Cat-Step-19-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/9\/9d\/Recognize-Signs-of-Shock-in-a-Cat-Step-19-Version-2.jpg\/aid8818817-v4-728px-Recognize-Signs-of-Shock-in-a-Cat-Step-19-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

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\n<\/p><\/div>"}. To save your cat's life, you'll need to recognize the symptoms, such as lethargy, irregular heart rate, and pale or discolored gums. For instance, a cat who has an abnormal gait might certainly be in pain, but other non-painful conditions (e.g., neurologic disorders) could also be involved. If she has broken ribs she just needs to rest. Weird & Wacky, Copyright © 2020 HowStuffWorks, a division of InfoSpace Holdings, LLC, a System1 Company. it was pitch black so i couldn't see anything, i only heard screeching, hissing, and growling outside my window. We use cookies to give you the best possible experience on our website. If shock comes about as the result of heat exhaustion or allergies, seek out your vet as soon as your cat starts to act lethargic or confused. The fact she is so shocked, hiding and hissing after several hours (plus limping) means she is probably in pain rather than just frightened. For good measure, you should also know how to prevent future occurrences. The cat has just been in full-on 'fight or flight mode.' They will normally cause severe abscesses which can appear soon after a fight. Search the Blog Trending Topics. To check your cat's pulse, place your hand on their chest just behind the left elbow. Injury. Any ideas. My cat and dog got into a fight. What else can I do? I've cleaned his wounds and put stuff on them. Urgent Care. Contact your vet if vomiting doesn't clear up after 24 hours or if diarrhea doesn't stop after 48 hours. Your veterinarian is the best person to help you decide whether these changes in your cat are pain-related. Tips for Training Your Holiday Guests To Not Feed Your Pups. Treating Shock In Cats. Source(s): https://shorte.im/a09EI. Subdued after fight. After a Dog Fight: 3 Steps to Helping Your Pup Recover Published on July 27, 2015 July 27, 2015 • 92 Likes • 19 Comments Shock is a life-threatening condition that occurs when oxygen and nutrients can't reach the tissues in a cat's body. Big mistake. My cat limped in last night. These wounds can remain hidden by hair. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners who may combine it with other information that you’ve provided to them or that they’ve collected from your use of their services. What happens after my cat has been bitten? Is My Cat In Shock After Fight? I don't know what to do because he just sits in the corner and twitches his tail really fast.